Friday, January 27, 2017

The New York Times discover that birds (and birders) like landfills

Follow the link to this article in the NYTimes today Birder's Heaven: Just Follow the Stench to the Landfill

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

The CER Lunchtime Lectures 2017
By Dr. Kevin M. Anderson,

AW Center for Environmental Research
Austin, Texas

Understanding Urban Nature: Ecology, Culture, and the American City



The 2017 Lunchtime Lectures will explore the complex relationship between the city and nature in America. Our American narrative of nature celebrates wilderness or “pristine nature” and rural or “pastoral nature” in contrast to the degradation of urban landscapes. However, we are now predominately a country of urbanites who have only recreational contact with wilderness or pastoral nature. To compensate for our urban “nature deficit”, we have incorporated “green space” into our cities - preserves, parks, farms, and gardens - to allow for contact with officially sanctioned approximations of wild and pastoral nature in the urban landscape. The urban nature that lives outside of these green spaces (or that “invasively” assaults them) is seen as a “degraded” type of nature. The resulting warlike narrative sets good nature that obeys its role in the American city against bad nature which has its own cosmopolitan plan for urban landscapes. The writer John Tallmadge describes urban nature as “just too mixed up, chaotic, and confused to fit our established notions of beauty and value in nature…Maybe it’s not really nature at all, not a real ecosystem, just a bunch of weeds and exotics mixed up with human junk.” Ecologists are called on to mediate and to assess whether it is a real ecosystem, and thereby add another chapter to the narrative entitled “urban ecology” in which science measures ecological cycles and ecosystem function in the city. The 2017 Lunchtime Lectures are an attempt to disentangle this complex story of ecology, culture, and the American City and, perhaps, to help you have a better understanding of urban nature. Join us on this exploration of urban nature!

Perspectives on Urban Nature

 January - Varieties of Possibility: Perspectives on Nature and the City
February - Urban Wild: Wilderness, Wildness, and the American City
March - Urban Pastoral: Farms, Gardens, and Parkland in the City
April - The Elemental City: Cycles, Services, and Urban Ecology


The Nature of Cities – Urban Natural History and Ecology
May - Nature in the City: Urban Habitats and the Degradation Myth
June - The Aquatic City: The Ecology of Urban Waterways
July - The Terrestrial City: Greenspace and the Urban Forest
August - The Subterranean City: Soil and the Urban Microcosmos
September - The Aerial City: Urban Birds, Bats, and Denizens of the Sky


The Proper Place of Urban Nature
October - Nature Out of Place: Invasive Species, Novel Ecosystems, and Urban Ecology
November - Design with Nature: Urban Planning, Management, and the Sustainability Myth
December - Encounters with Urban Nature: Ecology, the City, and the Arts


Time: Noon to 1pm
Free and Open to the Public – bring a lunch and learn


Locations and Day of the Month – Austin, Texas
Every 2nd Wednesday – Senior Activity Center-Lamar (SAC-Lamar) at 2874 Shoal Crest Ave, South Room
Every 3rd Tuesday - Austin Water Center for Environmental Research (CER) at Hornsby Bend
Every 3rd Thursday - One Texas Center (OTC) at 505 Barton Springs Road and South First Street, Room 325


The CER Lunchtime Lectures 2017 Schedule by Location -
SAC - Senior Activity Center-Lamar - 2874 Shoal Crest Ave, South Room at 29th and Lamar
CER - Austin Water Center for Environmental Research – 2210 South FM 973 at Hornsby Bend
OTC - One Texas Center - 505 Barton Springs Road, Room 325 at South First Street
Time: Noon to 1pm

Perspectives on Urban Nature [January – April]
January Lecture – Varieties of Possibility: Perspectives on Nature and the City
Jan 11 SAC
Jan 17 CER
Jan 19 OTC

February Lecture - Urban Wild: Wilderness, Wildness, and the American City
Feb 8 SAC
Feb 21 CER
Feb 16 OTC

March Lecture - Urban Pastoral: Farms, Gardens, and Parkland in the City
Mar 8 SAC
Mar 21 CER
(changed for SXSW)Mar 9 OTC

April Lecture - The Elemental City: Cycles, Services, and Urban Ecology
Apr 12 SAC
Apr 18 CER
Apr 20 OTC


The Nature of Cities – Urban Natural History and Ecology [May - September]
May Lecture - Nature in the City: Urban Habitats and the Degradation Myth
May 10 SAC
May 16 CER
May 18 OTC

June Lecture - The Aquatic City: The Ecology of Urban Waterways
June 14 SAC
June 15 OTC
June 20 CER

July Lecture - The Terrestrial City: Greenspace and the Urban Forest
July 12 SAC
July 18 CER
July 20 OTC

August Lecture - The Subterranean City: Soil and the Urban Microcosmos
Aug 9 SAC
Aug 15 CER
Aug 17 OTC

September Lecture - The Aerial City: Urban Birds, Bats, and Denizens of the Sky
Sept 13 SAC
Sept 19 CER
Sept 21 OTC


The Proper Place of Urban Nature [October – December]
October Lecture - Nature Out of Place: Invasive Species, Novel Ecosystems, and Urban Ecology
Oct 11 SAC
Oct 17 CER
Oct 19 OTC

November Lecture - Design with Nature: Urban Planning, Management, and the Sustainability Myth
Nov 8 SAC
Nov 21 CER
Nov 16 OTC

December Lecture - Encounters with Urban Nature: Ecology, the City, and the Arts
Dec 13 SAC
Dec 19 CER
Dec 21 OTC


Monday, June 13, 2016

The New York Times

From Garbage to Grassland

 
The world’s largest landfill is slowly becoming a park — very slowly. The conversion of Freshkills on the western shore of Staten Island into a verdant expanse of green is now in its second decade, with two more to go before it is finished.
 
 

Monday, June 06, 2016

The end of the idea of "pristine nature" but "nature" goes on...


An article today in the Washington Post headlined "There’s basically no landscape on Earth that humans haven’t altered" reviewing a paper published in PNAS with a touch of journalistic "more or less" .


the Post article is here "the end of nature has now been more or less confirmed by scientists"


the PNAS paper here Ecological consequences of human niche construction: Examining long-term anthropogenic shaping of global species distributions

Wednesday, December 30, 2015


AWU-CER Lunchtime Lectures 2016


By Dr. Kevin M. Anderson, AW Center for Environmental Research
 

The Unity of Nature: The Creation, Discovery, and End of Nature

In 1798, Alexander Von Humboldt (1769-1859) was appointed by the King of Spain to make the first extensive scientific exploration of Spanish America. “I shall collect plants and fossils and make astronomic observations. But that’s not the main purpose of my expedition – I shall try to find out how the forces of nature interact upon one another and how the geographic environment influences plant and animal life. In other words, I must find out about the unity of nature.” Equipped with the most sophisticated scientific field instruments of his time, Von Humboldt traveled through the New World mapping the biogeography of the Americas from 1799-1804. At the end of his journey, he had a new vision of nature – of isotherms, ecosystems, food webs, watersheds, climate change, and complex interconnectivity – and he had invented the concept of nature that we have today.

Before returning to Europe, at the invitation of President Thomas Jefferson, he stopped in the new United States and met with Jefferson and others. Through that meeting and his subsequent writings, he opened American culture to his vision of nature. On his return to the Old World, he became the most celebrated and influential scientist of his age. No one had a greater impact on the modern concept of the earth as a “natural whole” - a biogeochemical system open to rational explanation yet charged with imaginative potential and threatened by human mismanagement. This idea of nature - as an ordered unity, as a globally complex system of interconnections, as a cosmos open to imagination and wonder, as a subject for exacting scientific study, and as an object of human mismanagement – is now a familiar concept, however, in America, Von Humboldt is largely forgotten.

The 2016 CER Lunchtime Lectures will explore the concept of nature and Von Humboldt’s legacy. We will begin by examining the creation of our Western ideas of and the study of nature which laid the foundations for Von Humboldt’s ideas. From there, we will trace the influence of Von Humboldt on science, literature, and environmental management. In Europe, his influence ranged from shaping the ideas of nature for Goethe and the Romantic poets to inspiring scientists like Darwin, Agassiz, Haeckel, and others. Moreover, no other European had as great an impact on 19th century American intellectual culture from the sciences (Agassiz, Gray, Bache, Maury) to literature (Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Muir) and painting (Church, Catlin). In 1869, the centennial of his birth was celebrated across the globe, from Moscow to Mexico City and, in the United States, most cities hosted celebrations, with 10,000 people joining President Grant in Pittsburgh while 15,000 attended the festivities in New York City. One hundred years later, Von Humboldt was hardly remembered, but through our beliefs about nature his legacy persists. The year will end by seeing how his legacy emerges in contemporary environmentalism, environmental science, and the idea of the Anthropocene.
 
Each talk begins AT NOON
 

Locations and Day of the Month –

Every 3rd Tuesday - Austin Water Center for Environmental Research (CER) at Hornsby Bend
Austin Water – The University of Texas – Texas A&M University
A Partnership for Urban Ecology and Sustainability: Community, Ecology, Research
located at the Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant
2210 South FM 973, Austin, Texas 78725

Every 3rd Wednesday - One Texas Center (OTC) at 505 Barton Springs Road and South First Street, Austin, Texas -  Room 325
 

Free and Open to the Public – bring a lunch and learn

Time: Noon to 1pm


The Creation of Nature [January – March]

We begin the year by looking at the two dominant ideas of American nature: wilderness and pastoral nature. Wilderness as pure nature and spiritual solace has a unique hold on the American mind, but it lives in tension with the American agrarian ideal of family farm and ranch landscapes and culture. We will explore the origins, implications, and contradictions of these two ideas of nature, and then we will turn to the origins of life sciences and the study of nature beginning with the ancient Greeks and moving to the Enlightenment.


January 19 CER – First Nature: The Pristine Myth and Wilderness

January 20 OTC – First Nature: The Pristine Myth and Wilderness


February 16 CER – Second Nature: Pastoral Landscapes and the Cultivation of Nature

February 17 OTC – Second Nature: Pastoral Landscapes and the Cultivation of Nature


March 15 CER – The Study of Nature: Natural History and the Creation of Nature 

March 16 OTC – The Study of Nature: Natural History and the Creation of Nature 


The Discovery of Nature [April - September]

Over these six lectures, we will see how Alexander Von Humboldt transformed the practice of natural history and collecting nature into the science of nature. We will look at how he balanced imagination with scientific exactitude, thereby inspiring both poets and scientists to study nature in the 19th century. In particular, his influence on Darwin was profound both in setting Darwin’s life course and in fostering his idea of evolution. As the 19th century ended, new sciences of nature emerged and Von Humboldt’s ideas to shape in 20th century science and culture.


April 19 CER – The Nature Collectors: New Lands, New Nature, and Ecological Imperialism

April 20 OTC – The Nature Collectors: New Lands, New Nature, and Ecological Imperialism


May 17 CER – The Scientist of Nature: Alexander Von Humboldt and the Physical Description of the Earth

May 18 OTC – The Scientist of Nature: Alexander Von Humboldt and the Physical Description of the Earth


June 15 OTC – The Invention of Modern Nature: The Earth as a “Natural Whole”

June 21 CER  – The Invention of Modern Nature: The Earth as a “Natural Whole”

(NOTE THE REVERSED DAYS)


July 19 CER – The Romance of Nature: Science, Imagination, and the Poets of Nature

July 20 OTC – The Romance of Nature: Science, Imagination, and the Poets of Nature


August 16 CER – The Evolution of Nature: Von Humboldt, Darwin, and the Systematic Universe

August 17 OTC – The Evolution of Nature: Von Humboldt, Darwin, and the Systematic Universe


September 20 CER – The Economy of Nature: Ecology, Earth Science, and Biotic Navigation

September 21 OTC – The Economy of Nature: Ecology, Earth Science, and Biotic Navigation


The End of Nature [October – December]

Today Von Humboldt is largely forgotten in America, but his legacy persists in environmentalism, science, and natural resource management. The final three lectures will explore how his ideas persist in contemporary culture and how relevant his writings and ideas are to contemporary debates about climate change and human impacts on the Earth.


October 18 CER – The Great Disruptors: Environmentalism and the Idea of American Nature

October 19 OTC – The Great Disruptors: Environmentalism and the Idea of American Nature


November 15 CER – The Earth Managers: Balance, Resilience, and Environmental Science

November 16 OTC – The Earth Managers: Balance, Resilience, and Environmental Science


December 20 CER – The End of Nature: Permanence, Change, and the Anthropocene

December 21 OTC – The End of Nature: Permanence, Change, and the Anthropocene